Radiology Tests, Treatments, and Procedures 
 
 
 
 
 

Breast Imaging 

Breast MRI

 
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. In a breast MRI, a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer are used to produce detailed pictures of the breast. Breast MRI has many important uses, including:

  • Screening in women at high risk for breast cancer
  • Determining the extent of cancer after a new diagnosis of breast cancer
  • Further evaluating hard-to-assess abnormalities seen on digital mammography
  • Evaluating lumpectomy sites in the years following breast cancer treatment
  • Evaluating malignant abnormalities following chemotherapy treatment and prior to surgery.
  • Evaluating breast implants

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Digital Mammography

 
Digital Mammography is a specific type of imaging that uses a low-dose X-ray system to examine breasts. Mammograms are used as a screening tool to detect early breast cancer in women experiencing no symptoms and to detect and diagnose breast disease in women experiencing symptoms such as a lump, pain or nipple discharge.

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Stereotactic Breast Biopsy

A stereotactic breast biopsy is performed when a mammogram shows a breast abnormality such as:

  • a suspicious solid mass
  • microcalcifications, a tiny cluster of small calcium deposits
  • a distortion in the structure of the breast tissue
  • an area of abnormal tissue change
  • a new mass or area of calcium deposits is present at a previous surgery site.

A breast biopsy is performed to remove some cells—either surgically or through a less invasive procedure involving a hollow needle—from a suspicious area in the breast and examine them under a microscope to determine a diagnosis. In stereotactic breast biopsy, a special digital mammography machine uses ionizing radiation to help guide the radiologist's instruments to the site of the abnormal growth.

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Breast Ultrasound

Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions.  Ultrasound imaging of the breast produces a picture of the internal structures of the breast.

The primary use of breast ultrasound today is to help diagnose breast abnormalities detected by a physician during a physical exam and to characterize potential abnormalities seen on digital mammography or breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

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Cardiac Imaging  

 
Coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) is a heart imaging test that helps determine if plaque buildup has narrowed a patient's coronary arteries.

Coronary CTA may be performed for patients who have:
  • suspected abnormal anatomy of the coronary arteries.
  • low or medium risk for coronary artery disease, including patients who have chest pain and normal, non-diagnostic or unclear lab and ECG results.
  • non-acute chest pain.
  • new or worsening symptoms with a previous normal stress test result.
  • unclear or inconclusive stress test results.
  • new onset heart failure with reduced left ventricle function and low or medium risk for coronary artery disease.
  • medium risk of coronary artery disease, before non-coronary cardiac surgery.
  • coronary artery bypass grafts.
In addition to identifying coronary artery narrowing as the cause of chest discomfort, coronary CTA can also detect other possible causes of symptoms, such as a collapsed lung, blood clot in the vessels leading to the lungs, or acute aortic abnormalities.

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Cardiac MRI (Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging)  

 

Cardiac MRI imaging is performed to help:
  • evaluate the anatomy and function of the heart, valves, major vessels, and surrounding structures (such as the surrounding pericardial sac).
  • diagnose a variety of cardiovascular (heart and/or blood vessel) disorders such as tumors, infections, and inflammatory conditions.
  • detect and evaluate the effects of coronary artery disease such as limited blood flow to the heart muscle and scarring within the heart muscle after heart attack.
  • plan a patient's treatment for cardiovascular disorders.
  • monitor a patient's progression over time.

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Computed Tomography (CT or CAT scan)

 

CT scanning—sometimes called CAT scanning—is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. CT scanning combines special X-ray equipment with sophisticated computers to produce multiple images or pictures of the inside of the body. These cross-sectional images of internal organs, bones, soft tissue and blood vessels provide greater clarity and reveal more details than regular X-ray exams.

Using this specialized equipment, radiologists can more easily diagnose problems such as cancers, cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, appendicitis, trauma and musculoskeletal disorders.

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Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

 
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. MRI uses a powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, bone and virtually all other internal body structures.  Detailed MR images allow physicians to better evaluate various parts of the body and determine the presence of certain diseases.

Wide Bore MRI.  Hahnemann offers the option of wide bore MRI equipment to accommodate patients of all sizes.  The larger size of the wide bore MRI also benefits patients who suffer from claustrophobia and may become anxious during an MRI. With a foot of spacious headroom, patients no longer feel as though they’re nose-to-nose with the top of the machine.  Because of the machine’s design, most exams can be done with the patient’s head outside of the system.  Most importantly, its high power delivers superior images which enhance patient care.

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Nuclear Medicine

Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material to diagnose and determine the severity of and/or treat a variety of diseases, including many types of cancers, heart disease, gastrointestinal, endocrine, neurological disorders and other abnormalities within the body. Nuclear medicine procedures offer the potential to identify disease in its earliest stages as well as a patient’s immediate response to therapeutic interventions.

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Positron emission tomography (PET scan)

Positron emission tomography, also called PET imaging or a PET scan, is a type of nuclear medicine imaging used to diagnose and determine the severity of and/or treat a variety of diseases, including many types of cancers, heart disease, gastrointestinal, endocrine, neurological disorders and other abnormalities within the body. A PET scan measures important body functions, such as blood flow, oxygen use, and sugar (glucose) metabolism, to help doctors evaluate how well organs and tissues are functioning.

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Radiation Therapy (Oncology)

Radiation therapy is the careful use of high-energy radiation to treat cancer. A radiation oncologist may use radiation to cure cancer or to relieve a cancer patient's pain or alleviate other symptoms due to the cancer.

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Ultrasound (Sonography/Vascular)

 
Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography/vascular, involves exposing part of the body to high-frequency sound waves to produce pictures that show the structure and movement of internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels.

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X-Rays (Radiography)

An X-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Imaging with X-rays involves exposing a part of the body to a small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the body. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging.

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Hahnemann University Hospital | 230 N Broad St, Philadelphia, PA 19102